‘Rosie The Riveter’ Iconicized The American Women Who Truly Fought Fascism

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

This Memorial Day, as we honor all those who have served and sacrificed on our behalf, let us not forget the American women who fought on the home front during World War II, and whose efforts ultimately helped us defeat the horrors of real fascism. It all started with a fictional gal named “Rosie the Riveter.”

A Tale of Two Rosies
Whenever we hear the name Rosie the Riveter, we tend to think of Westinghouse artist J. Howard Miller’s popular image of a spirited “We Can Do It” WWII-era woman, with her hair wrapped in a white polka-dotted red scarf, rolled up sleeves, and flexed bicep.

But this originally nameless 1942 rendering, part of an early government effort to rally badly needed American female workers, was never intended to be “Rosie.” Our modern Rosie association came about in the 1980s, after the feminist movement adopted the image as a symbol of female empowerment. Today, the icon appears on everything from coffee mugs to beach towels.

Read More at The Federalist

Liberal Fascism

Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left from Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning (New York: Doubleday, 2009)

The word “fascist,” much like “racist,” has long been a favorite insult of the Left to silence their opposition. Unfortunately, fascist is so widely thrown about these days that it trivializes the evils of real fascism. As a result, this perpetuates a perverted understanding of the word fascist as “everyone I don’t like.”

But here’s the irony. Jonah Goldberg, in his book Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left from Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning, “reminds us that the original fascists were really on the left, and that liberals from Woodrow Wilson to FDR to Hillary Clinton have advocated policies and principles remarkably similar to those of Hitler’s National Socialism and Mussolini’s Fascism.” For example, the Nazis “believed in free health care and guaranteed jobs. They confiscated inherited wealth and spent vast sums on public education. They purged the church from public policy, promoted a new form of pagan spirituality, and inserted the authority of the state into every nook and cranny of daily life. The Nazis declared war on smoking, supported abortion, euthanasia, and gun control. They loathed the free market, provided generous pensions for the elderly, and maintained a strict racial quota system in their universities—where campus speech codes were all the rage.”

Goldberg’s book is a gem and a must read!