God and the Public Square: The History No Longer Taught in School

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

Our founding fathers believed that America’s birth was the work of a Divine hand. How else could a small collection of farming colonies have won it’s independence from the mighty British Crown?

The Apotheosis of Washington

The founders also understood that civic virtue and morality were absolutely essential if citizens were going to govern themselves. In the words of our second president John Adams, “Our Constitution was made only for a religious and moral people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.”

Unfortunately, this important part of our history is no longer taught in school. No wonder there’s so much hostility toward free speech these days, let alone religious expression. But it wasn’t always this way.

Recently, while visiting our nation’s capitol, I was amazed to see just how much religion was front and center everywhere I went. In fact, America’s capitol is a treasure trove of religious symbolism found on canvas, parchment, stained-glass, stone, and marble. Throughout the National Mall, God in the public square really isn’t such a taboo after all, as secularists would have us believe.

The National Archives Building
My journey began at the National Archives, a repository for America’s historic documents. My mission was to see our Charters of Freedom—the Declaration of Independence (1776), Constitution of the United States (1787), and Bill of Rights (1791)—located in the building’s rotunda.

Just before entering the rotunda there’s a bronze floor inlay of the Ten Commandments. This image was intended to convey that our legal system originated in God’s law.

Judge Plays God to Ban ‘Unimportant’ Bible Verse

By Andrew Shirley/Shirley & Banister Public Affairs. This article was recently published at CharismaNews.com and makes clear just how dangerously brazen the enemies of liberty have become.

The military’s highest court ruled yesterday that men and women serving in the U.S. Armed Forces can be punished for exercising their religion if judges deem the practice not religiously “important.” The ruling upholds the government’s criminal prosecution of a U.S. Marine for refusing to discard personal notes that had Bible verses on them. The case may now be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Marine Lance Cpl. Monifa Sterling

In 2014, Marine Lance Corporal Monifa Sterling was ordered to remove from her workstation three pieces of paper with a paraphrase from the book of Isaiah, “No weapon formed against me shall prosper,” even though co-workers were permitted to keep nonreligious messages on their desks. She declined and was court-martialed. A lower court upheld Sterling’s court martial, rejecting her argument that her faith was protected by the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

“This is a real-life example of why judges shouldn’t play theologians,” said Daniel Blomberg, legal counsel of the Becket Fund, which filed a friend-of-the-court brief supporting the Lance Corporal. “Here, a few judges concluded that keeping Scripture nearby isn’t ‘important,’ even though more than half of the world’s population belong to religions that teach the exact opposite. Avoiding obvious errors like this is why RFRA protects all religious beliefs, not just beliefs that government officials deem ‘important.’’’

Read more at Charisma News.

Harriet Tubman’s “Live Free or Die” Spirit

By now, you’re probably aware that the $20 bill is getting a facelift. Apparently, our government has nothing better to do than turn our paper currency into wallet-sized political billboards, starting with replacing the image of white, male, Democrat and slaveholder President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) with that of black, female, Republican and abolitionist Harriet Tubman (1822-1913).

Harriet Tubman

Personally, I don’t have a problem with Harriet Tubman’s image appearing on our currency. I can care less that she’s black, or a woman for that matter. Those are just superficial differences that progressive bureaucrats love to exploit, even though such attributes say nothing about the value of an individual.

However, what intrigues me most about Tubman is that, despite being born into slavery on a Maryland plantation in 1822, she refused to think of herself as a victim. You might even say she was driven by a “Live Free or Die” spirit. Unfortunately, this side of Tubman is never mentioned in the history books. Therefore, I shall do the honors.

T’was A Month Before Christmas

The following poem was sent to me by a friend. Author is unknown.

T’was a month before Christmas
When all through our land,

"Adoration of the Shepherd's" by Gerard von Honthorst, 1622

Not a Christian was praying
Nor taking a stand.

Why the PC Police had taken away
The reason for Christmas––no one could say.

The  children were told by their schools not to sing
About Shepherds and Wise Men and Angels and things.

It might hurt people’s feelings, the teachers would say
December 25th is just a “holiday.”

Yet the shoppers were ready with cash, checks, and credit
Pushing folks down to the floor just to get it!

CD’s from Madonna, an X BOX, an iPod
Something was changing, something quite odd!

Retailers promoted Ramadan and Kwanzaa
In hopes to sell books by Franken & Fonda.