Are Segregated Dorms the New Bigoted Safe Spaces For Minorities?

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

The University of Connecticut recently announced plans to build a racially segregated dorm for black male students. What’s next, separate water fountains?

UConn Segregated Dorm, ScHOLA2RS House

As someone who received a doctorate in anthropology from UConn, I certainly don’t relish in drawing attention to how race-conscious my old stomping grounds have become. Nevertheless, I shall call it as I see it.

For starters, the dorm couldn’t have a more obnoxious name. It’s called “ScHOLA2RS House,” which stands for Scholastic House of Leaders Who Are African American Researchers and Scholars. This seems a bit over the top given the name doesn’t quite fit the target residents who university officials think need all the help they can get just to feel successful, let alone like leaders.

“African American males graduate at a lower rate than their peers,” said Dr. Erik Hines, Professor of Educational Psychology and Faculty Director of the initiative. “So the University of Connecticut was forward-thinking in bringing a solution to the issue.” Solution? Perhaps, if your goal is to be a glorified babysitter.

Now if you’re scratching your head over the “foreword-thinking” thing, don’t worry. This is quintessential progressive propaganda. Still, the most important question remains: How will UConn’s segregated housing scheme actually benefit black male students who, after all, have to go out into the real world after graduation and live among a more diverse population?

Policing Culture at the University of Washington

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

There’s a new wave of hard core political correctness sweeping college campuses. It’s called cultural appropriation. As explained by a University of Washington student, it’s when “you take something from a culture that isn’t yours and basically use it for your own purposes. A lot of times this involves a majority culture taking bits and pieces of a minority culture in a way that trivializes it, in away that misrepresents it and pulls it out of context, or in a way that stereotypes other people.”

Cultural Appropriation at UW

If this leaves you scratching your head, don’t worry. There’s a whole group of UW students who, having crowned themselves with a certain level of elitism, have put together a video instructing the rest of us Cro-Magnon types on how to avoid cultural appropriation. As one might expect, they make fools of themselves in the process.

Nevertheless, as you watch the video, you can almost imagine yourself in a museum walking from one “cultural exhibit” to another as you’re immediately hit with a sense of separatism and victimhood. Of course, it would have been more helpful had the students actually known something about culture before starting their little grievance project.

Still, as an anthropologist who escaped the grips of leftist academia before my own brain could turn to mush, I am somewhat sympathetic to those afflicted with critical thinking attrition, a common byproduct of today’s higher education. Perhaps these students deserve a refund.

It used to be that anyone could take a good Anthropology 101 class and get an honest lesson on cultural diffusion. This simply refers to the natural spreading of cultural traits, mainly through migration, trade, and war. Cultures adopt and tinker with traits that work for them and abandon those traits that don’t. It’s one of the key mechanisms of cultural change and advancement, and the primary reason isolated cultures tend to lag behind everyone else.

While it’s obvious the students never learned about cultural diffusion they do, however, seem to know plenty about cultural isolation. In case you haven’t noticed, college campuses are hotbeds of victim identities, where many students have aligned themselves with a special, separate culture of oppression. Victim cultures wear their victimhood as a badge of moral virtue. They see themselves as innocent and everyone else is out to get them.