God and the Public Square: The History No Longer Taught in School

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

Our founding fathers believed that America’s birth was the work of a Divine hand. How else could a small collection of farming colonies have won it’s independence from the mighty British Crown?

The Apotheosis of Washington

The founders also understood that civic virtue and morality were absolutely essential if citizens were going to govern themselves. In the words of our second president John Adams, “Our Constitution was made only for a religious and moral people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.”

Unfortunately, this important part of our history is no longer taught in school. No wonder there’s so much hostility toward free speech these days, let alone religious expression. But it wasn’t always this way.

Recently, while visiting our nation’s capitol, I was amazed to see just how much religion was front and center everywhere I went. In fact, America’s capitol is a treasure trove of religious symbolism found on canvas, parchment, stained-glass, stone, and marble. Throughout the National Mall, God in the public square really isn’t such a taboo after all, as secularists would have us believe.

The National Archives Building
My journey began at the National Archives, a repository for America’s historic documents. My mission was to see our Charters of Freedom—the Declaration of Independence (1776), Constitution of the United States (1787), and Bill of Rights (1791)—located in the building’s rotunda.

Just before entering the rotunda there’s a bronze floor inlay of the Ten Commandments. This image was intended to convey that our legal system originated in God’s law.

Remembering Our American Flag Day

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

For more than a year after our founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence, the newly formed United States still didn’t have an official flag.

Happy Flag Day!

Finally, on June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress passed a “Flag Resolution” that declared: “Resolved, That the flag of the [thirteen] United States be 13 stripes, alternate red and white: that the union be 13 stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation” (p. 464, Journals of the Continental Congress, Volume 8). This new flag became the first definitive national symbol of our country, representing the 13 former colonies––now the United States—Massachusetts, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Rhode Island, Georgia, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Maryland.

Although Congress gave some overall specifics on what the flag should look like, it left open details of its final design. Soon, someone took the initiative to make a flag with the stars arranged in a perfect circle, symbolizing the powerful unity between the new states. This is sometimes called the Betsy Ross flag because according to legend it was Ross who sewed the first flag—affectionately known as “stars and stripes”—for George Washington to use as a motivating symbol for American soldiers in the Revolutionary War.

Do You Patronize Businesses That Undermine Your Freedoms and Values?

By Kimberly Bloom JacksonPinned Post

When my husband and I arrived at the door of a local restaurant that came highly recommended to us, we couldn’t believe our eyes.

No Guns Sign

On their door was the infamous “NO GUNS” sign. We looked at each other in disbelief. How could the owner of the restaurant be so stupid as to draw attention to an establishment full of unarmed customers? Worse yet, how could customers be so stupid? It’s like hanging an “easy target” sign around every neck.

Fact is, mindless gun-free zones are what mass shootings have in common. They are killing zones, free from good guys with guns. That’s why the Aurora movie theater killer chose the more distant theater where guns were not allowed and thus where he wouldn’t have to worry about his plan being foiled.

Still, too many people remain in denial. Recently, an Olive Garden employee asked an on duty Kansas City police officer who was in full uniform to leave the restaurant because he was—wait for it—carrying a gun!

Intense reaction to the incident on social media prompted an Olive Garden spokesperson to apologize for the “misunderstanding.” “We love having members of law enforcement dine with us,” he said. Really? Olive Garden may say they love law enforcement, but did you know they hate the Second Amendment?

As for that restaurant with the “no gun” sign my husband and I visited, needless to say, we moved on to safer turf.