Remembering Our American Flag Day

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

For more than a year after our founding fathers signed the Declaration of Independence, the newly formed United States still didn’t have an official flag.

Happy Flag Day!

Finally, on June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress passed a “Flag Resolution” that declared: “Resolved, That the flag of the [thirteen] United States be 13 stripes, alternate red and white: that the union be 13 stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation” (p. 464, Journals of the Continental Congress, Volume 8). This new flag became the first definitive national symbol of our country, representing the 13 former colonies––now the United States—Massachusetts, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Rhode Island, Georgia, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Maryland.

Although Congress gave some overall specifics on what the flag should look like, it left open details of its final design. Soon, someone took the initiative to make a flag with the stars arranged in a perfect circle, symbolizing the powerful unity between the new states. This is sometimes called the Betsy Ross flag because according to legend it was Ross who sewed the first flag—affectionately known as “stars and stripes”—for George Washington to use as a motivating symbol for American soldiers in the Revolutionary War.

Keeping Up With the Real Racists

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

The definition of racist has changed so much it’s hard to keep up.

Remember the days when a racist was someone who believed in the innate superiority of one race over another? Tragically, this ideology provided the basis for racists to segregate, victimize, and deny the rights of others. Nevertheless, this is precisely what defined a real racist.

America isn’t perfect, but a lot has changed for the better. Just look at all those of color who want to come here and all the white America haters who won’t leave for what they think is better grazing. To me, this speaks volumes.

Still, progressive rabble-rousers must keep their investment in race current. In 1997, for example, UC Berkeley sponsored a conference, The Making and Unmaking of Whiteness, where activists “critically” examined whiteness. Within three days, they concluded that white people are the “passive inheritors of a system of privilege and wealth.” You know it by its more fashionable name white privilege.

Such sweeping Marxist pronouncements have helped real racists forge their own definition of racism, not as acts or attitudes committed by individuals, but a racism that permanently links all white people. And since no white person wants to be associated with racism, many whites today have enthusiastically embraced feigned diversity oriented reforms and policies just to disassociate themselves from any taint of historical racism. This is called white guilt and it’s the real racist’s secret weapon.