Are White Oscar Nominees Worthy?

By Kimberly Bloom Jackson

Have you heard the news? All 20 Oscar nominees in the acting categories are white! There’s even a Twitter hashtag called #OscarsSoWhite. Now Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, Viola Davis, Michael Moore, and other race conscious glitterati have announced that they will not be attending Hollywood’s most prestigious ceremony on February 28.

#OscarsSoWhite

What message does this send to the nominees whose exceptional work is supposed to be celebrated by all? Is everyone else at the awards ceremony now expected to take their cue from race-baiting crybabies and forego congratulating this year’s winners?

To make matters worse, the president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who is black, had the audacity to say that she was “heartbroken and frustrated” over the lack of diversity among this year’s nominees. For the second year in a row, too many whiteys were voted in by the Academy’s reported 6,261 voting membership, of which the majority is supposedly white, though it’s overall composition remains unclear. Because of this, the Academy members have already been called a bunch of racists. But is this really all there is to the story?

As is the case with all propaganda, especially in Hollywood, you have to read between the lines.

Are this year’s nominees worthy of Oscar nods? Of course they are, as long as you take into account the fact that each year somebody has to win regardless of how good or bad the choices are. But that’s not the question everyone should be asking. The right question is, “Why isn’t anyone crying foul over the lack of quality performances overall, which is the real point?” Nevertheless, race conscious elites can’t help but to just hold up diversity (aka color) as a moral virtue, even though their diversity is based on a superficial attribute that has nothing to do with the value of an individual’s talent.

T’was A Month Before Christmas

The following poem was sent to me by a friend. Author is unknown.

T’was a month before Christmas
When all through our land,

"Adoration of the Shepherd's" by Gerard von Honthorst, 1622

Not a Christian was praying
Nor taking a stand.

Why the PC Police had taken away
The reason for Christmas––no one could say.

The  children were told by their schools not to sing
About Shepherds and Wise Men and Angels and things.

It might hurt people’s feelings, the teachers would say
December 25th is just a “holiday.”

Yet the shoppers were ready with cash, checks, and credit
Pushing folks down to the floor just to get it!

CD’s from Madonna, an X BOX, an iPod
Something was changing, something quite odd!

Retailers promoted Ramadan and Kwanzaa
In hopes to sell books by Franken & Fonda.

Dissecting Political Correctness

By Stella Morabito. This article was originally posted at The Public Discourse. It’s a brilliant piece that I believe sets the tone for everything I hope to achieve on SnoopingAnthropologist.com. Enjoy!

To resist the manipulative forces of political correctness, we must speak out and overcome the social isolation that breeds silence. Victory in the war of ideas often hinges more on the conditions of battle than on the quality of arguments. You know this instinctively if you’ve ever been shouted down, smeared, or ignored when you were simply trying to state a point. Truly civil public discourse becomes much harder when our dialogue is hijacked by thought policing—euphemistically referred to as “political correctness,” or PC.

No Free Speech Ahead

Political correctness has cultivated an illusion of support for laws that undermine fundamental institutions of society, including marriage and family. The only way to dispel this illusion, and to reverse the damage these laws will do, is to revive true civil discourse. To do this, we must motivate ourselves and others to overcome the reticence to speak our minds. It is a process that has to begin one-on-one and face-to-face. As people feel less alone in their views, they will be more inclined to speak out.

Political correctness feeds on the fear of speaking views that diverge from PC “truth.” Although the primary forces behind political correctness are those who develop and convey ideas—college professors and administrators, Hollywood producers and directors, celebrities, mainstream news anchors, and so on—we all perpetuate political correctness when we succumb to the fear of contradicting PC “truth.”

Read more at The Public Discourse.

QUESTION: How are you kicking PC in the butt? Share your thoughts on Twitter or on your favorite social media.